Gone to Texas A History of the Lone Star State

Filename: gone-to-texas-a-history-of-the-lone-star-state.pdf
ISBN: 9780199881383
Release Date: 2003-08-07
Number of pages: 512
Author: Randolph B. Campbell
Publisher: Oxford University Press

Download and read online Gone to Texas A History of the Lone Star State in PDF and EPUB In Gone to Texas, historian Randolph Campbell ranges from the first arrival of humans in the Panhandle some 10,000 years ago to the dawn of the twenty-first century, offering an interpretive account of the land, the successive waves of people who have gone to Texas, and the conflicts that have made Texas as much a metaphor as a place. Campbell presents the epic tales of Texas history in a new light, offering revisionist history in the best sense--broadening and deepening the traditional story, without ignoring the heroes of the past. The scope of the book is impressive. It ranges from the archeological record of early Native Americans to the rise of the oil industry and ultimately the modernization of Texas. Campbell provides swift-moving accounts of the Mexican revolution against Spain, the arrival of settlers from the United States, and the lasting Spanish legacy (from place names to cattle ranching to civil law). The author also paints a rich portrait of the Anglo-Texan revolution, with its larger-than-life leaders and epic battles, the fascinating decade of the Republic of Texas, and annexation by the United States. In his account of the Civil War and Reconstruction, he examines developments both in local politics and society and in the nation at large (from the debate over secession to the role of Texas troops in the Confederate army to the impact of postwar civil rights laws). Late nineteenth-century Texas is presented as part of both the Old West and the New South. The story continues with an analysis of the impact of the Populist and Progressive movements and then looks at the prosperity decade of the 1920s and the economic disaster of the Great Depression. Campbell's last chapters show how World War II brought economic recovery and touched off spectacular growth that, with only a few downturns, continues until today. Lucid, engaging, deftly written, Gone to Texas offers a fresh understanding of why Texas continues to be seen as a state unlike any other, a place that distills the essence of what it means to be an American.


Gone to Texas

Filename: gone-to-texas.pdf
ISBN: 0190642394
Release Date: 2017
Number of pages: 488
Author: Randolph B. Campbell
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Download and read online Gone to Texas in PDF and EPUB Gone to Texas: A History of the Lone Star State engagingly tells the story of the Lone Star State, from the arrival of humans in the Panhandle more than 10,000 years ago to the opening of the twenty-first century. Focusing on the state's successive waves of immigrants, the book offers an inclusive view of the vast array of Texans who, often in conflict with each other and always in a struggle with the land, created a history and an idea of Texas. An Instructor's Resource Manual and a set of approximately 400 PowerPoint slides to accompany Gone to Texas, Third Edition, are now available to adopters. Please contact your local Oxford University Press representative for details.


Gone to Texas

Filename: gone-to-texas.pdf
ISBN: 0199779406
Release Date: 2012-07-12
Number of pages: 528
Author: Randolph B. "Mike" Campbell
Publisher: OUP USA

Download and read online Gone to Texas in PDF and EPUB Gone to Texas engagingly tells the story of the Lone Star State, from the arrival of humans in the Panhandle more than 10,000 years ago to the opening of the twenty-first century. Focusing on the state's successive waves of immigrants, the book offers an inclusive view of the vast array of Texans who, often in conflict with each other and always in a struggle with the land, created a history and an idea of Texas.


Lone Star

Filename: lone-star.pdf
ISBN: 9781497609709
Release Date: 2014-04-01
Number of pages: 792
Author: T. R. Fehrenbach
Publisher: Open Road Media

Download and read online Lone Star in PDF and EPUB The definitive account of the incomparable Lone Star state by the author of Fire & Blood: A History of Mexico. T. R. Fehrenbach is a native Texan, military historian and the author of several important books about the region, but none as significant as this work, arguably the best single volume about Texas ever published. His account of America's most turbulent state offers a view that only an insider could capture. From the native tribes who lived there to the Spanish and French soldiers who wrested the territory for themselves, then to the dramatic ascension of the republic of Texas and the saga of the Civil War years. Fehrenbach describes the changes that disturbed the state as it forged its unique character. Most compelling is the one quality that would remain forever unchanged through centuries of upheaval: the courage of the men and women who struggled to realize their dreams in The Lone Star State.


As Texas Goes How the Lone Star State Hijacked the American Agenda

Filename: as-texas-goes-how-the-lone-star-state-hijacked-the-american-agenda.pdf
ISBN: 9780871404756
Release Date: 2012-06-04
Number of pages: 304
Author: Gail Collins
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

Download and read online As Texas Goes How the Lone Star State Hijacked the American Agenda in PDF and EPUB “Gail Collins is the funniest serious political commentator in America. Reading As Texas Goes… is pure pleasure from page one.” —Rachel Maddow As Texas Goes . . . provides a trenchant yet often hilarious look into American politics and the disproportional influence of Texas, which has become the model for not just the Tea Party but also the Republican Party. Now with an expanded introduction and a new concluding chapter that will assess the influence of the Texas way of thinking on the 2012 election, Collins shows how the presidential race devolved into a clash between the so-called “empty places” and the crowded places that became a central theme in her book. The expanded edition will also feature more examples of the Texas style, such as Governor Rick Perry’s nearsighted refusal to accept federal Medicaid funding as well as the proposed ban on teaching “critical thinking” in the classroom. As Texas Goes . . . will prove to be even more relevant to American politics by the dawn of a new political era in January 2013.


Texas

Filename: texas.pdf
ISBN: 193333715X
Release Date: 2007
Number of pages: 256
Author: Archie P. McDonald
Publisher: State House Press

Download and read online Texas in PDF and EPUB Texas "a whole other country"-a slogan that promotes tourism as much within the Lone Star State as elsewhere-is familiar to native Texans and those adopted sons and daughters who "got here just as quickly as they could." Texas is as varied as East Texas timberland, hundreds of miles of seashore, prairies of the Central and High Plains, and the dry desert of far West Texas. When traveling abroad and asked, "Where are you from?" residents of forty-nine of the United States usually respond, "the USA." Nearly every citizen of the Lone Star State will answer "Texas!" The world encourages such chauvinism. Mass media celebrates and exploits Texas and Texans in television and motion pictures about the Alamo, Texas Rangers, the oil industry, and athletics, to name only a few genre. Texans' pride in their distinctiveness increases when their state is paraded-or satired-and they consciously "pass it on" to succeeding generations. But what does it mean to be a Texan? How did Texas come to be as it is? Texas: A Compact History provides answers to such questions about Texans and Texas. It tells the story of Texas history and provides thoughtful interpretations about the state's development, all with the general reader in mind-in a brief, easily read narrative. ARCHIE P. McDONALD is the author of numerous books dealing with various aspects of Texas history, including Back Then: Simple Pleasures and Everyday Heroes (State House Press, 2005)


From South Texas to the Nation

Filename: from-south-texas-to-the-nation.pdf
ISBN: 9781469625249
Release Date: 2015-08-25
Number of pages: 336
Author: John Weber
Publisher: UNC Press Books

Download and read online From South Texas to the Nation in PDF and EPUB In the early years of the twentieth century, newcomer farmers and migrant Mexicans forged a new world in South Texas. In just a decade, this vast region, previously considered too isolated and desolate for large-scale agriculture, became one of the United States' most lucrative farming regions and one of its worst places to work. By encouraging mass migration from Mexico, paying low wages, selectively enforcing immigration restrictions, toppling older political arrangements, and periodically immobilizing the workforce, growers created a system of labor controls unique in its levels of exploitation. Ethnic Mexican residents of South Texas fought back by organizing and by leaving, migrating to destinations around the United States where employers eagerly hired them--and continued to exploit them. In From South Texas to the Nation, John Weber reinterprets the United States' record on human and labor rights. This important book illuminates the way in which South Texas pioneered the low-wage, insecure, migration-dependent labor system on which so many industries continue to depend.


An Empire for Slavery

Filename: an-empire-for-slavery.pdf
ISBN: 0807117234
Release Date: 1991-08-01
Number of pages: 320
Author: Randolph B. Campbell
Publisher: LSU Press

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The Depression in Texas

Filename: the-depression-in-texas.pdf
ISBN: STANFORD:36105039851105
Release Date: 1983
Number of pages: 249
Author: Donald W. Whisenhunt
Publisher: Dissertations-G

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Sam Houston and the American Southwest

Filename: sam-houston-and-the-american-southwest.pdf
ISBN: 0321091396
Release Date: 2002
Number of pages: 225
Author: Randolph B. Campbell
Publisher: Longman Publishing Group

Download and read online Sam Houston and the American Southwest in PDF and EPUB In this biography, Randolph B. Campbell explores the life of Sam Houston and his important role in the development of the Southwest. Paperback, brief, and inexpensive, each of the titles in the Library of American Biography Series focus on a figure whose actions and ideas significantly influenced the course of American history and national life. In addition, each biography relates the life of its subject to the broader themes and developments of the times.


Gone to Texas

Filename: gone-to-texas.pdf
ISBN: 0848809548
Release Date: 1976-01-01
Number of pages: 206
Author: Forrest Carter
Publisher:

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Crisis in the Southwest

Filename: crisis-in-the-southwest.pdf
ISBN: 0842028013
Release Date: 2002-01-01
Number of pages: 172
Author: Richard Bruce Winders
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

Download and read online Crisis in the Southwest in PDF and EPUB Richard Bruce Winders provides a concise, accessible overview of the Mexican War and argues that the Mexican War led directly to the Civil War by creating a political and societal crisis that drove a wedge between the North and the South. While on the surface the enemy was Mexico, in reality Americans were at odds with one another over the future of the nation, as the issue of annexation threatened to upset the balance between free and slave states.


Mexican Americans in Texas

Filename: mexican-americans-in-texas.pdf
ISBN: STANFORD:36105132195335
Release Date: 2009-01-20
Number of pages: 219
Author: Arnoldo De Leon
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

Download and read online Mexican Americans in Texas in PDF and EPUB This third edition of our ground-breaking publication, the first survey of Tejanos, has been completely updated to present a concise political, cultural, and social history of Mexican Americans in Texas from the Spanish colonial era to the present day, a time when people of Mexican descent are poised to become the demographic majority in the Lone Star. Writing specifically for the college-level student and careful to include a consensus of the latest literature in this strong and continually growing field, Professor De León portrays Tejanos as active subjects, not merely objects, in the ongoing Texas story. Complemented by a stunning photographic essay and a helpful glossary, and featuring new biographical vignettes that now introduce and set the context for each chapter, this third edition of our well-loved text is certain to be even more engaging and relevant to readers of all levels. And while the book targets a wide reading audience, it is ideally fit for classroom use. Professors teaching courses in Texas, western, and borderlands history will find it an ideal complement to their class lectures and other outside reading assignments. Of particular interest to students will be discussions describing the survival techniques Tejanos developed to withstand poverty and disadvantage, the process of assimilation over many generations, the changes engendered by the Chicano Movement of the 1960s, the role of political figures such as José Antonio Navarro, J. T. Canales, Alonso Perales, Héctor P. García, or Irma Rangel, or the impact of court cases like which Hernández v. Texas or Plyler v. Doe that changed the direction of Mexican American history.


ACT 36 in Just 7 Steps

Filename: act-36-in-just-7-steps.pdf
ISBN: 9780071814416
Release Date: 2013-10-08
Number of pages: 368
Author: Maria Filsinger
Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional

Download and read online ACT 36 in Just 7 Steps in PDF and EPUB A guide to preparing for the ACT offers advice on test taking, specific suggestions for math, science, and reading sections, one full length practice test, and tips for mastering the five paragraph essay.


Sleuthing the Alamo

Filename: sleuthing-the-alamo.pdf
ISBN: 9780199755806
Release Date: 2004-12-01
Number of pages: 228
Author: James E. Crisp
Publisher: Oxford University Press

Download and read online Sleuthing the Alamo in PDF and EPUB In Sleuthing the Alamo, historian James E. Crisp draws back the curtain on years of mythmaking to reveal some surprising truths about the Texas Revolution--truths that are often obscured by both racism and political correctness. This engaging first-person account of historical detective work illuminates the methods of the serious historian who searches for the more complex truths behind the glorious myths. Beginning with a personal prologue recalling both the pride and the prejudices that he encountered in the Texas of his youth, Crisp illustrates how he discovered documents that have been distorted, censored, and ignored. In four chapters focusing on specific documentary "finds," he uncovers the clues that led to these archival discoveries. Along the way, the cast of characters expands to include: a prominent historian who tried to walk away from his first book; an unlikely teenaged "speechwriter" for General Sam Houston; three eyewitnesses to the death of Davy Crockett at the Alamo; a desperate inmate of Mexico City's Inquisition Prison, whose scribbled memoir of the war in Texas is now listed in the Guinness Book of World Records; and the stealthy slasher of the most famous historical painting in Texas. In his afterword, Crisp explores the evidence behind the mythic "Yellow Rose of Texas" and examines some of the powerful forces at work in silencing the voices from the past that we most need to hear today. An indispensable resource for anyone interested in the Alamo or historical detective work, Sleuthing the Alamo is also ideal for undergraduate courses in historical methodology, southwestern borderlands, the American West, Texas history, American expansion, Mexican-American history, race relations, and Southern history.