More Than Just Food

Filename: more-than-just-food.pdf
ISBN: 9780520962569
Release Date: 2016-02-09
Number of pages: 296
Author: Garrett Broad
Publisher: Univ of California Press

Download and read online More Than Just Food in PDF and EPUB The industrial food system has created a crisis in the United States that is characterized by abundant food for privileged citizens and “food deserts” for the historically marginalized. In response, food justice activists based in low-income communities of color have developed community-based solutions, arguing that activities like urban agriculture, nutrition education, and food-related social enterprises can drive systemic social change. Focusing on the work of several food justice groups—including Community Services Unlimited, a South Los Angeles organization founded as the nonprofit arm of the Southern California Black Panther Party—More Than Just Food explores the possibilities and limitations of the community-based approach, offering a networked examination of the food justice movement in the age of the nonprofit industrial complex.


Cultivating Food Justice

Filename: cultivating-food-justice.pdf
ISBN: 9780262016261
Release Date: 2011
Number of pages: 389
Author: Alison Hope Alkon
Publisher: MIT Press

Download and read online Cultivating Food Justice in PDF and EPUB Popularized by such best-selling authors as Michael Pollan, Barbara Kingsolver, and Eric Schlosser, a growing food movement urges us to support sustainable agriculture by eating fresh food produced on local family farms. But many low-income neighborhoods and communities of color have been systematically deprived of access to healthy and sustainable food. These communities have been actively prevented from producing their own food and often live in "food deserts" where fast food is more common than fresh food. Cultivating Food Justice describes their efforts to envision and create environmentally sustainable and socially just alternatives to the food system. Bringing together insights from studies of environmental justice, sustainable agriculture, critical race theory, and food studies, Cultivating Food Justice highlights the ways race and class inequalities permeate the food system, from production to distribution to consumption. The studies offered in the book explore a range of important issues, including agricultural and land use policies that systematically disadvantage Native American, African American, Latino/a, and Asian American farmers and farmworkers; access problems in both urban and rural areas; efforts to create sustainable local food systems in low-income communities of color; and future directions for the food justice movement. These diverse accounts of the relationships among food, environmentalism, justice, race, and identity will help guide efforts to achieve a just and sustainable agriculture.


California Cuisine and Just Food

Filename: california-cuisine-and-just-food.pdf
ISBN: 9780262304931
Release Date: 2012-10-05
Number of pages: 376
Author: Sally K. Fairfax
Publisher: MIT Press

Download and read online California Cuisine and Just Food in PDF and EPUB Can a celebrity chef find common ground with an urban community organizer? Can a maker of organic cheese and a farm worker share an agenda for improving America's food? In the San Francisco Bay area, unexpected alliances signal the widening concerns of diverse alternative food proponents. What began as niche preoccupations with parks, the environment, food aesthetics, and taste has become a broader and more integrated effort to achieve food democracy: agricultural sustainability, access for all to good food, fairness for workers and producers, and public health. This book maps that evolution in northern California. The authors show that progress toward food democracy in the Bay area has been significant: innovators have built on familiar yet quite radical understandings of regional cuisine to generate new, broadly shared expectations about food quality, and activists have targeted the problems that the conventional food system creates. But, they caution despite the Bay Area's favorable climate, progressive politics, and food culture many challenges remain.


Concentration and Power in the Food System

Filename: concentration-and-power-in-the-food-system.pdf
ISBN: 9781472581143
Release Date: 2016-02-25
Number of pages: 216
Author: Philip H. Howard
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

Download and read online Concentration and Power in the Food System in PDF and EPUB Nearly every day brings news of another merger or acquisition involving the companies that control our food supply. Just how concentrated has this system become? At almost every key stage of the food system, four firms alone control 40% or more of the market, a level above which these companies have the power to drive up prices for consumers and reduce their rate of innovation. Researchers have identified additional problems resulting from these trends, including negative impacts on the environment, human health, and communities. This book reveals the dominant corporations, from the supermarket to the seed industry, and the extent of their control over markets. It also analyzes the strategies these firms are using to reshape society in order to further increase their power, particularly in terms of their bearing upon the more vulnerable sections of society, such as recent immigrants, ethnic minorities and those of lower socioeconomic status. Yet this study also shows that these trends are not inevitable. Opposed by numerous efforts, from microbreweries to seed saving networks, it explores how such opposition has encouraged the most powerful firms to make small but positive changes.


Sweet Charity

Filename: sweet-charity.pdf
ISBN: 0140245561
Release Date: 1999
Number of pages: 354
Author: Janet Poppendieck
Publisher: Penguin

Download and read online Sweet Charity in PDF and EPUB Assesses the effectiveness of volunteer hunger relief programs, and argues that they will be unable to meet the increases brought about by welfare reform


Weighing In

Filename: weighing-in.pdf
ISBN: 9780520949751
Release Date: 2011-11-05
Number of pages: 248
Author: Julie Guthman
Publisher: Univ of California Press

Download and read online Weighing In in PDF and EPUB Weighing In takes on the "obesity epidemic," challenging many widely held assumptions about its causes and consequences. Julie Guthman examines fatness and its relationship to health outcomes to ask if our efforts to prevent "obesity" are sensible, efficacious, or ethical. She also focuses the lens of obesity on the broader food system to understand why we produce cheap, over-processed food, as well as why we eat it. Guthman takes issue with the currently touted remedy to obesity—promoting food that is local, organic, and farm fresh. While such fare may be tastier and grown in more ecologically sustainable ways, this approach can also reinforce class and race inequalities and neglect other possible explanations for the rise in obesity, including environmental toxins. Arguing that ours is a political economy of bulimia—one that promotes consumption while also insisting upon thinness—Guthman offers a complex analysis of our entire economic system.


Food Farms and Community

Filename: food-farms-and-community.pdf
ISBN: 9781611686876
Release Date: 2014-12-02
Number of pages: 304
Author: Lisa Chase
Publisher: University of New Hampshire Press

Download and read online Food Farms and Community in PDF and EPUB Throughout the United States, people are increasingly concerned about where their food comes from, how it is produced, and how its production affects individuals and their communities. The answers to these questions reveal a complex web of interactions. While large, distant farms and multinational companies dominate at national and global levels, innovative programs including farmers' markets, farm-to-school initiatives, and agritourism are forging stronger connections between people and food at local and regional levels. At all levels of the food system, energy use, climate change, food safety, and the maintenance of farmland for the future are critical considerations. The need to understand food systems--what they are, who's involved, and how they work (or don't)--has never been greater. Food, Farms, and Community: Exploring Food Systems takes an in-depth look at critical issues, successful programs, and challenges for improving food systems spanning a few miles to a few thousand miles. Case studies that delve into the values that drive farmers, food advocates, and food entrepreneurs are interwoven with analysis supported by the latest research. Examples of entrepreneurial farms and organizations working together to build sustainable food systems are relevant to the entire country--and reveal results that are about much more than fresh food.


Food Ethics The Basics

Filename: food-ethics-the-basics.pdf
ISBN: 9781135045463
Release Date: 2014-10-17
Number of pages: 216
Author: Ronald L. Sandler
Publisher: Routledge

Download and read online Food Ethics The Basics in PDF and EPUB Food Ethics: The Basics is a concise yet comprehensive introduction to the ethical dimensions of the production and consumption of food. It offers an impartial exploration of the most prominent ethical questions relating to food and agriculture including: • Should we eat animals? • Are locally produced foods ethically superior to globally sourced foods? • Do people in affluent nations have a responsibility to help reduce global hunger? • Should we embrace bioengineered foods? • What should be the role of government in promoting food safety and public health? Using extensive data and real world examples, as well as providing suggestions for further reading, Food Ethics: The Basics is an ideal introduction for anyone interested in the ethics of food.


The Stop

Filename: the-stop.pdf
ISBN: 9781612193502
Release Date: 2013-10-01
Number of pages: 320
Author: Nick Saul
Publisher: Melville House

Download and read online The Stop in PDF and EPUB “[A] terrific book about a visionary post–food bank project.” —Michael Pollan THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER British super chef Jamie Oliver called it "amazing," writing that he'd traveled all over the world and never seen anything like it. New York Times food writer Mark Bittman called it "one of those forward-thinking groups pointing the way to the future of good food." Raj Patel, the critically acclaimed author of Stuffed and Starved, said he was "blown away" by it. So what is it? The Stop, a Community Food Centre that has revolutionized the way we combat hunger and poverty. Since community worker Nick Saul became the executive director of The Stop in 1998, it has been transformed from a cramped food bank to a thriving, internationally respected Community Food Centre. The Stop has flourished with gardens, kitchens, a greenhouse, farmers' markets and a mission to revolutionize our food system. In a voice that's "never preachy" (MacLean's), Saul and Curtis share what The Stop could mean for the future of food, and argue that everyone deserves a dignified, healthy place at the table. From the Trade Paperback edition.


The Urban Food Revolution

Filename: the-urban-food-revolution.pdf
ISBN: 9781550924886
Release Date: 2013-10-18
Number of pages: 304
Author: Peter Ladner
Publisher: New Society Publishers

Download and read online The Urban Food Revolution in PDF and EPUB Planning cities as if food matters


Divided Spirits

Filename: divided-spirits.pdf
ISBN: 9780520962583
Release Date: 2015-10-01
Number of pages: 280
Author: Sarah Bowen
Publisher: Univ of California Press

Download and read online Divided Spirits in PDF and EPUB Divided Spirits tells the stories of tequila and mezcal, two of Mexico’s most iconic products. In doing so, the book illustrates how neoliberalism influences the production, branding, and regulation of local foods and drinks. It also challenges the strategy of relying on “alternative” markets to protect food cultures and rural livelihoods. In recent years, as consumers increasingly demand to connect with the people and places that produce their food, the concept of terroir—the taste of place—has become more and more prominent. Tequila and mezcal are both protected by denominations of origin (DOs), legal designations that aim to guarantee a product’s authenticity based on its link to terroir. Advocates argue that the DOs expand market opportunities, protect cultural heritage, and ensure the reputation of Mexico’s national spirits. Yet this book shows how the institutions that are supposed to guard “the legacy of all Mexicans” often fail those who are most in need of protection: the small producers, agave farmers, and other workers who have been making tequila and mezcal for generations. The consequences—for the quality and taste of tequila and mezcal, and for communities throughout Mexico—are stark. Divided Spirits suggests that we must move beyond market-based models if we want to safeguard local products and the people who make them. Instead, we need systems of production, consumption, and oversight that are more democratic, more inclusive, and more participatory. Lasting change is unlikely without the involvement of the state and a sustained commitment to addressing inequality and supporting rural development.


The New Food Activism

Filename: the-new-food-activism.pdf
ISBN: 9780520965652
Release Date: 2017-06-27
Number of pages: 344
Author: Alison Alkon
Publisher: Univ of California Press

Download and read online The New Food Activism in PDF and EPUB The New Food Activism explores how food activism can be pushed toward deeper and more complex engagement with social, racial, and economic justice and toward advocating for broader and more transformational shifts in the food system. Topics examined include struggles against pesticides and GMOs, efforts to improve workers’ pay and conditions throughout the food system, and ways to push food activism beyond its typical reliance on individualism, consumerism, and private property. The authors challenge and advance existing discourse on consumer trends, food movements, and the intersection of food with racial and economic inequalities.


The Darjeeling Distinction

Filename: the-darjeeling-distinction.pdf
ISBN: 9780520957602
Release Date: 2013-11-23
Number of pages: 244
Author: Sarah Besky
Publisher: Univ of California Press

Download and read online The Darjeeling Distinction in PDF and EPUB Nestled in the Himalayan foothills of Northeast India, Darjeeling is synonymous with some of the finest and most expensive tea in the world. It is also home to a violent movement for regional autonomy that, like the tea industry, dates back to the days of colonial rule. In this nuanced ethnography, Sarah Besky narrates the lives of tea workers in Darjeeling. She explores how notions of fairness, value, and justice shifted with the rise of fair-trade practices and postcolonial separatist politics in the region. This is the first book to explore how fair-trade operates in the context of large-scale plantations. Readers in a variety of disciplines—anthropology, sociology, geography, environmental studies, and food studies—will gain a critical perspective on how plantation life is changing as Darjeeling struggles to reinvent its signature commodity for twenty-first-century consumers. The Darjeeling Distinction challenges fair-trade policy and practice, exposing how trade initiatives often fail to consider the larger environmental, historical, and sociopolitical forces that shape the lives of the people they intended to support.


Just Food

Filename: just-food.pdf
ISBN: 0316148563
Release Date: 2014-05-21
Number of pages: 137
Author: James E. McWilliams
Publisher: Little Brown

Download and read online Just Food in PDF and EPUB "Just Food" does for fresh food what "Fast Food Nation" did for fast food, challenging conventional views, and cutting through layers of myth and misinformation.


City bountiful

Filename: city-bountiful.pdf
ISBN: 0520243439
Release Date: 2005-05-30
Number of pages: 363
Author: Laura J. Lawson
Publisher: Univ of California Pr

Download and read online City bountiful in PDF and EPUB Since the 1890s, providing places for people to garden has been an inventive strategy to improve American urban conditions. There have been vacant-lot gardens, school gardens, Depression-era relief gardens, victory gardens, and community gardens--each representing a consistent impulse to return to gardening during times of social and economic change. In this critical history of community gardening in America, the most comprehensive review of the greening of urban communities to date, Laura J. Lawson documents the evolution of urban garden programs in the United States. Her vibrant narrative focuses on the values associated with gardening, the ebb and flow of campaigns during times of social and economic crisis, organizational strategies of these primarily volunteer campaigns, and the sustainability of current programs.