The Early Chinese Empires

Filename: the-early-chinese-empires.pdf
ISBN: 9780674040144
Release Date: 2009-06-30
Number of pages: 333
Author: Mark Edward LEWIS
Publisher: Harvard University Press

Download and read online The Early Chinese Empires in PDF and EPUB In 221 B.C. the First Emperor of Qin unified what would become the heart of a Chinese empire whose major features would endure for two millennia. In the first of a six-volume series on the history of imperial China, Lewis highlights the key challenges facing the court officials and scholars who set about governing an empire of such scale and diversity.


The Early Chinese Empires

Filename: the-early-chinese-empires.pdf
ISBN: 0674057341
Release Date: 2010
Number of pages: 321
Author: Mark Edward Lewis
Publisher: Belknap Press

Download and read online The Early Chinese Empires in PDF and EPUB This first book in a six-volume series begins at the creation of an ancient imperial order whose major features would endure for two millennia. It illuminates many formative events in China's long history of imperialism, events whose residual influence can still be discerned today.


The Early Chinese Empires

Filename: the-early-chinese-empires.pdf
ISBN: UOM:39015069375759
Release Date: 2007
Number of pages: 321
Author: Mark Edward LEWIS
Publisher: Belknap Press

Download and read online The Early Chinese Empires in PDF and EPUB In 221 B.C. the First Emperor of Qin unified what would become the heart of a Chinese empire whose major features would endure for two millennia. In the first of a six-volume series on the history of imperial China, Lewis highlights the key challenges facing the court officials and scholars who set about governing an empire of such scale and diversity.


The Early Chinese Empires

Filename: the-early-chinese-empires.pdf
ISBN: UOM:39015069375759
Release Date: 2007
Number of pages: 321
Author: Mark Edward LEWIS
Publisher: Belknap Press

Download and read online The Early Chinese Empires in PDF and EPUB In 221 B.C. the First Emperor of Qin unified what would become the heart of a Chinese empire whose major features would endure for two millennia. In the first of a six-volume series on the history of imperial China, Lewis highlights the key challenges facing the court officials and scholars who set about governing an empire of such scale and diversity.


Women in Early Imperial China

Filename: women-in-early-imperial-china.pdf
ISBN: 9780742568242
Release Date: 2010-08-16
Number of pages: 256
Author: Bret Hinsch
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

Download and read online Women in Early Imperial China in PDF and EPUB After a long spell of chaos, the Qin and Han dynasties (221 BCE–220 CE) saw the unification of the Chinese Empire under a single ruler, government, and code of law. During this era, changing social and political institutions affected the ways people conceived of womanhood. New ideals were promulgated, and women's lives gradually altered to conform to them. And under the new political system, the rulers' consorts and their families obtained powerful roles that allowed women unprecedented influence in the highest level of government. Recognized as the leading work in the field, this introductory survey offers the first sustained history of women in the early imperial era. Now in a revised edition that incorporates the latest scholarship and theoretical approaches, the book draws on extensive primary and secondary sources in Chinese and Japanese to paint a remarkably detailed picture of the distant past. Bret Hinsch's introductory chapters orient the nonspecialist to early imperial Chinese society; subsequent chapters discuss women's roles from the multiple perspectives of kinship, wealth and work, law, government, learning, ritual, and cosmology. An enhanced array of line drawings, a Chinese-character glossary, and extensive notes and bibliography enhance the author's discussion. Historians and students of gender and early China alike will find this book an invaluable overview.


The Establishment of the Han Empire and Imperial China

Filename: the-establishment-of-the-han-empire-and-imperial-china.pdf
ISBN: 031332588X
Release Date: 2005-01-01
Number of pages: 170
Author: Grant Hardy
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

Download and read online The Establishment of the Han Empire and Imperial China in PDF and EPUB Examines the Han empire from political, geographical, material, and cultural perspectives.


China s Cosmopolitan Empire

Filename: china-s-cosmopolitan-empire.pdf
ISBN: 9780674054196
Release Date: 2012-04-02
Number of pages: 368
Author: Mark Edward Lewis
Publisher: Harvard University Press

Download and read online China s Cosmopolitan Empire in PDF and EPUB The Tang dynasty is often called China’s “golden age,” a period of commercial, religious, and cultural connections from Korea and Japan to the Persian Gulf, and a time of unsurpassed literary creativity. Mark Lewis captures a dynamic era in which the empire reached its greatest geographical extent under Chinese rule, painting and ceramic arts flourished, women played a major role both as rulers and in the economy, and China produced its finest lyric poets in Wang Wei, Li Bo, and Du Fu.


China between Empires

Filename: china-between-empires.pdf
ISBN: 9780674040151
Release Date: 2009-06-30
Number of pages: 350
Author: Mark Edward LEWIS
Publisher: Harvard University Press

Download and read online China between Empires in PDF and EPUB After the collapse of the Han dynasty in the third century CE, China divided along a north-south line. This book traces the changes that both underlay and resulted from this split in a period that saw the geographic redefinition of China, more engagement with the outside world, significant changes to family life, developments in the literary and social arenas, and the introduction of new religions.


The Troubled Empire

Filename: the-troubled-empire.pdf
ISBN: 0674046021
Release Date: 2010-06-30
Number of pages: 329
Author: Timothy Brook
Publisher: Harvard University Press

Download and read online The Troubled Empire in PDF and EPUB Explores the history of China between the Mongol reunification of China in 1279 under the Yuan dynasty and the Manchu invasion four centuries later, explaining how climate changes profoundly affect the empire during this period. By the author of Collaboration: Japanese Agents and Local Elites in Wartime China


Age of Empires

Filename: age-of-empires.pdf
ISBN: 9781588396174
Release Date: 2017-03-27
Number of pages: 268
Author: Zhixin Jason Sun
Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Download and read online Age of Empires in PDF and EPUB Spanning four centuries, from 221 B.C. to A.D. 220, the Qin and Han dynasties were pivotal to Chinese history, establishing the social and cultural underpinnings of China as we know it today. Age of Empires: Art of the Qin and Han Dynasties is a revelatory study of the dawn of China’s imperial age, delving into more than 160 objects that attest to the artistic and cultural flowering that occurred under Qin and Han rule. Before this time, China consisted of seven independent states. They were brought together by Qin Shihuangdi, the self-proclaimed First Emperor of the newly unified realm. Under him, the earliest foundations of the Great Wall were laid, and the Qin army made spectacular advances in the arts of war—an achievement best expressed in the magnificent army of lifesize terracotta warriors and horses that stood before his tomb, seven of which are reproduced here. The Han built on the successes of the Qin, the increasing wealth and refinement of the empire reflected in dazzling bronze and lacquer vessels, ingeniously engineered lamps, and sparkling ornaments of jade and gold from elite Han tombs. But of all the achievements of the Qin-Han era, the most significant is, no doubt, the emergence of a national identity, for it was during this time of unprecedented change that people across the empire began to see themselves as one, with China as their common homeland. p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 14.0px Verdana} With its engaging, authoritative essays and evocative illustrations, Age of Empires provides an invaluable record of a unique epoch in Chinese history, one whose historic and artistic impact continues to resonate into the modern age.


Everyday Life in Early Imperial China During the Han Period 202 BC AD 220

Filename: everyday-life-in-early-imperial-china-during-the-han-period-202-bc-ad-220.pdf
ISBN: 0872207587
Release Date: 1968
Number of pages: 208
Author: Michael Loewe
Publisher: Hackett Publishing

Download and read online Everyday Life in Early Imperial China During the Han Period 202 BC AD 220 in PDF and EPUB In this lively and accessible account, with illustrations on nearly every page, Michael Loewe gives us a vivid picture of the lives of peasants working the land, the lives of town inhabitants, and the elaborate hierarchy of institutions and civil servants that sustained the vast imperial government. In a new Preface and an updated Bibliography, Loewe calls our attention to the significance of scholarly research and discoveries since the original publication of his classic work.


Early China

Filename: early-china.pdf
ISBN: 9780521895521
Release Date: 2013-12-30
Number of pages: 367
Author: Li Feng
Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Download and read online Early China in PDF and EPUB A critical new interpretation of the early history of Chinese civilization based on the most recent scholarship and archaeological discoveries.


Communication and Cooperation in Early Imperial China

Filename: communication-and-cooperation-in-early-imperial-china.pdf
ISBN: 9781438450384
Release Date: 2014-02-01
Number of pages: 261
Author: Charles Sanft
Publisher: SUNY Press

Download and read online Communication and Cooperation in Early Imperial China in PDF and EPUB Challenges traditional views of the Qin dynasty as an oppressive regime by revealing cooperative aspects of its governance. This revealing book challenges longstanding notions of the Qin dynasty, China’s first imperial dynasty (221–206 BCE). The received history of the Qin dynasty and its founder is one of cruel tyranny with rule through fear and coercion. Using a wealth of new information afforded by the expansion of Chinese archaeology in recent decades as well as traditional historical sources, Charles Sanft concentrates on cooperative aspects of early imperial government, especially on the communication necessary for government. Sanft suggests that the Qin authorities sought cooperation from the populace with a publicity campaign in a wide variety of media—from bronze and stone inscriptions to roads to the bureaucracy. The book integrates theory from anthropology and economics with early Chinese philosophy and argues that modern social science and ancient thought agree that cooperation is necessary for all human societies.


Ancient China

Filename: ancient-china.pdf
ISBN: 9781317503651
Release Date: 2016-10-04
Number of pages: 300
Author: John S. Major
Publisher: Routledge

Download and read online Ancient China in PDF and EPUB Ancient China: A History surveys the East Asian Heartland Region – the geographical area that eventually became known as China – from the Neolithic period through the Bronze Age, to the early imperial era of Qin and Han, up to the threshold of the medieval period in the third century CE. For most of that long span of time there was no such place as "China"; the vast and varied territory of the Heartland Region was home to many diverse cultures that only slowly coalesced, culturally, linguistically, and politically, to form the first recognizably Chinese empires. The field of Early China Studies is being revolutionized in our time by a wealth of archaeologically recovered texts and artefacts. Major and Cook draw on this exciting new evidence and a rich harvest of contemporary scholarship to present a leading-edge account of ancient China and its antecedents. With handy pedagogical features such as maps and illustrations, as well as an extensive list of recommendations for further reading, Ancient China: A History is an important resource for undergraduate and postgraduate courses on Chinese History, and those studuing Chinese Culture and Society more generally.


Rome and China

Filename: rome-and-china.pdf
ISBN: 0199714290
Release Date: 2009-02-05
Number of pages: 256
Author: Walter Scheidel
Publisher: Oxford University Press

Download and read online Rome and China in PDF and EPUB Transcending ethnic, linguistic, and religious boundaries, early empires shaped thousands of years of world history. Yet despite the global prominence of empire, individual cases are often studied in isolation. This series seeks to change the terms of the debate by promoting cross-cultural, comparative, and transdisciplinary perspectives on imperial state formation prior to the European colonial expansion. Two thousand years ago, up to one-half of the human species was contained within two political systems, the Roman empire in western Eurasia (centered on the Mediterranean Sea) and the Han empire in eastern Eurasia (centered on the great North China Plain). Both empires were broadly comparable in terms of size and population, and even largely coextensive in chronological terms (221 BCE to 220 CE for the Qin/Han empire, c. 200 BCE to 395 CE for the unified Roman empire). At the most basic level of resolution, the circumstances of their creation are not very different. In the East, the Shang and Western Zhou periods created a shared cultural framework for the Warring States, with the gradual consolidation of numerous small polities into a handful of large kingdoms which were finally united by the westernmost marcher state of Qin. In the Mediterranean, we can observe comparable political fragmentation and gradual expansion of a unifying civilization, Greek in this case, followed by the gradual formation of a handful of major warring states (the Hellenistic kingdoms in the east, Rome-Italy, Syracuse and Carthage in the west), and likewise eventual unification by the westernmost marcher state, the Roman-led Italian confederation. Subsequent destabilization occurred again in strikingly similar ways: both empires came to be divided into two halves, one that contained the original core but was more exposed to the main barbarian periphery (the west in the Roman case, the north in China), and a traditionalist half in the east (Rome) and south (China). These processes of initial convergence and subsequent divergence in Eurasian state formation have never been the object of systematic comparative analysis. This volume, which brings together experts in the history of the ancient Mediterranean and early China, makes a first step in this direction, by presenting a series of comparative case studies on clearly defined aspects of state formation in early eastern and western Eurasia, focusing on the process of initial developmental convergence. It includes a general introduction that makes the case for a comparative approach; a broad sketch of the character of state formation in western and eastern Eurasia during the final millennium of antiquity; and six thematically connected case studies of particularly salient aspects of this process.